KnowledgeBase » Performance

Is hot-dip galvanized steel considered anti-sparking?

Yes, hot-dip galvanized coatings are anti-sparking and non-incendiary as are most zinc coatings. The exception is zinc coating alloys that have 30 to 55% aluminum. It is important to realize if the galvanized steel is struck hard enough, and the zinc coating is penetrated all the way down to the base steel, then the steel could spark of course. Source: Corrosion Resistance of Zinc and Zinc Alloys, by Frank Porter, pg. 97
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Can hot-dip galvanized steel be used for beds of dump trucks for road salts?

Road salts can be very corrosive to galvanized steel (as well as other protective coatings). When the salts are dry they are not very corrosive, but once water is added to the salts, the saltwater solution will aggressively attack the galvanized coating. If water is expected to accumulate on top of the salts and then seep down (which is reasonable to assume due to precipitation), it is reasonable to expect the galvanized coating to be consumed...
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Methods to Reduce the Occurrence of Strain-Age Embrittlement

There are several ways to reduce the occurrence of strain-age embrittlement, but all methods focus on one aspect – reducing the stresses induced into the steel prior to galvanizing. Instead of cold working, which induces stresses into steel, the steel can be hot worked at temperatures between 1100F and 1300F. If it is necessary to cold work the steel,...
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Is it safe for food to be in contact with galvanized steel?

For most foods, contact with galvanized steel is perfectly safe. Only acidic foods should not come in contact with galvanized steel according the the U.S. Food & Drug Administration. The acid in some foods reacts with the zinc coating to form salts that are readily absorbed by the body and in excess could cause a very mild sickness. So, where is galvanized steel used ...
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Hot-Dip Galvanized Steel in Contact with Treated Wood

Pressure treated wood is often used for construction areas that will be exposed to the weather or in high moisture areas. The chemicals used to treat this wood have been revised in 2003 to remove some of the potential harmful elements in the pressure treatment. The change in chemical formulations has had a secondary effect on the corrosivity of the pressure tr...
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Hot-Dip Galvanized Steel in Water Applications

The varieties of water throughout the world differ to the extent that predicting corrosion rates is very difficult for all coatings. Many parameters affect corrosion of metals in a water environment , including pH level, oxygen content, water temperature, water climate and tide conditions, to name a few. Despite the difficulty of
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Hot-Dip Galvanized Reinforcing Steel (Rebar) in Concrete Applications

Galvanized reinforcing steel is effectively and economically used in concrete where unprotected reinforcement will not have adequate durability. The susceptibility of concrete structures to the intrusion of chlorides is the primary incentive for using galvanized steel reinforcement. Galvanized reinforcing steel...
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Hot-Dip Galvanized Steel in Contact with Other Metals

Hot-dip galvanized steel is well suited for use in a variety of environments and fabrications, and sometimes is placed in contact with different metals including, among others, stainless steel, aluminum, copper and weathering steel. When two different metals are in contact in a corrosive environment, one of the metals experiences accelerated galvani...
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Atmospheric corrosion of hot-dip galvanized steel

The corrosion rate of zinc is directly influenced by atmospheric conditions. Certain factors that specifically affect the corrosion of zinc include: temperature, humidity, rainfall, sulfur dioxide (pollution) concentration in the air, and air salinity. None of these factors can be singled out as the main contributor to zinc corrosion, but they all play a role in deter...
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Does magnesium chloride corrode galvanized steel?

Magnesium chloride can aggressively attack many types of steel, including galvanized steel. Wet magnesium chloride is more aggressive than dry. Magnesium chloride should not be left on galvanized steel for prolonged periods of time. Washing the galvanized steel with a dilute mild detergent and then rinsing with fresh water is sufficient for removing magnesium chloride. Detergents meant for aluminum should not be used on galvanized steel....
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